WARRAH

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Cow Horn Spiral
Cow Horn Spiral

Just when we thought things could not get any more dramatic, life sent us all another curveball. In times of great upheaval it’s calming to focus on the things that remain constant – the natural rhythms of nature, the harvest, the satisfaction of physical labour outdoors, preparing and eating a nourishing meal.

On the farm we have been harvesting the last of the summer crops and preparing for the cooler seasonal veg. The ground has been soaked by the rains from February, and only recently have we seen some regular sunshine return. There are chickens in the newly completed chicken run, and at least one of the hens is laying.

Our Therapeutic Gardening team has been able to do a bit of nursery work again. It is gratifying to see Warrah participants getting the chance to sow seeds and grow seedlings for the farm. Work on our spiral garden project has continued with individual Warrah participants. They have begun making mud bricks for the sensory garden, which will be a focus once our programs can resume as normal.

Our beloved cows, Elke and Frangipani have a great time grazing our fallow paddocks, eating scraps from the shop and leaving their magic manure behind. Recently the crew from Biodynamic Sydney visited us for their annual mission to prepare Horn Manure (500). This preparation is produced during the cooler months to use in spring as a fertilising spray. Fresh biodynamic cow manure is pushed into old cow horns and buried in rich topsoil for 4-6 months. Come spring, the horns are dug up and this beautifully fermented, nutrient dense compost is collected and used to enhance and rejuvenate the soil.

Our Specialist School has launched its new website – warrahspecialistschool.nsw.edu.au. It includes some lovely aerial views of the rural campus and images of students busy at school and on the farm.